Learn English – Podcast: I wouldn’t be so sure about that.

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Today’s sentence Hello again. How’s it going? Well, here’s the latest in the series on expressing doubts. I wouldn’t be so sure about that. Notes You might say this if someone is completely sure about something, and you know / strongly believe they are wrong. E.g. “I am convinced that Hamlet was written by Napoleon Bonaparte.” You: “I wouldn’t be so sure about that!” Be a bit careful with this expression: depending on how you say it, you could sound a bit big-headed! It means, “You’re wrong! Or, at least, I really, really think you are wrong.” Who did write Hamlet, anyway? I’m not 100% sure… And that’s all for today. Guess what? We’ll look at another one tomorrow! See you then! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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Learn English – Podcast: We don’t know that for sure and certain.

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Today’s sentence Hello! How are things? Here’s the latest in the series on expressing doubts. We don’t know that for sure and certain. Notes Imagine the scene: there’s been a robbery and £1000 has been stolen. Someone is found with £1000 in his pocket. He’s a suspect. However, we don’t know for sure and certain that he stole the money. It’s still only a possibility. Sure means exactly the same as certain. Why do we use both words in the same expression? For greater emphasis. We could also say, “we don’t know that for sure,” or, “we don’t know that for certain.” OK, that’s all for today. We’ll take a look at another expression for expressing doubts tomorrow. See you! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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Learn English – Podcast: Maybe it’s not like that.

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Today’s sentence Greetings! Here’s today’s sentence in the series on expressing doubts. Maybe it’s not like that. Notes Again, here’s an expression which says that you are not totally convinced by an argument / sure that something is true. E.g. Someone says the following: “I think that Jim stole the thousand pounds because he was found with £1000 in his pocket and we know that he owes a lot of money to the bank.” And you say: “Maybe it’s not like that: maybe he won £1000 gambling on horses…” It’s very much like yesterday’s “we don’t know that for sure and certain.” And that, as they say, is that. More tomorrow…see you! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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Learn English – Podcast: Are you sure about that?

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Today’s sentence Hi. How’s it going? Here’s the latest in the series on expressing doubts. Are you sure about that? Notes This is like the sentence we looked at a few days ago: “I wouldn’t be so sure about that.” However, it’s not quite as strong as “I wouldn’t be so sure about that.” “I wouldn’t be so sure about that,” sounds very opinionated. Today’s sentence merely asks if the other person’s assertion is absolutely true or if he or she has any doubts about it – because you certainly have a few doubts! Right…we’re going to look at the last in this series tomorrow. See you then! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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Learn English – Podcast: I can fit you in at 10.30 on Tuesday morning. Is that suitable for you?

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Today’s sentence Welcome back. This is a reply to yesterday’s request. I can fit you in at 10.30 on Tuesday morning. Is that suitable for you? Notes Do you remember yesterday’s sentence? “I’d like to make an appointment to see Dr. Jones, please.” The secretary replies: “I can fit you in at…” This means that s/he can see from the diary that Dr. Jones is free at 10.30. Is that suitable for you? Is that a good time for you? Can you come here at that time? You could also ask, “Does that suit you?” Tomorrow we’ll look at a possible answer to the secretary’s question. Bye for now! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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Learn English – Podcast: I don’t know about that.

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Today’s sentence Hi! This is the last in the current series on expressing doubts. I don’t know about that. Notes Well, this is another way of expressing doubt about something. E.g. Your son (who is 13) says, “I’d like to go to a rock concert tonight.” You are doubtful whether it is a good idea or not. Is he too young? Can he be trusted? Etc. So you say, “well, Jimmy, I don’t know about that…” You are doubting the wisdom of letting him go. Alternatively, it is also like the sentences we have seen over the past few days. It doubts the wisdom / veracity of what other people are saying. E.g. “The world is flat.” “Well, I don’t know about that. I’m pretty sure it’s round, actually.” And that’s all. We’re going to start a new theme tomorrow. If you have any questions about anything regarding this theme, don’t hesitate to contact me on our forum, “Let’s Chew!” And remember…it’s OK for YOU to answer other students’ questions if you want to… Bye for now! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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Learn English – Podcast: I’m afraid I won’t be able to make that. Do you have anything available later on?

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Today’s sentence Hi, welcome back. This is a reply to yesterday’s question. I’m afraid I won’t be able to make that. Do you have anything available later on? Notes You can’t go to the doctor’s at 10.30 but you can go later in the day. I’m afraid = I’m sorry. It’s a strange expression. What are you afraid of? Nothing. I won’t be able = the future of I can’t. You can say, “I’m afraid I can’t make that,” too. Make that. = arrive at that time. E.g. I made it to the airport just in time = I arrived at the airport… Anything available – another time I can go / is the doctor free at another time. Later on = later. Later on means the same thing. People say it a lot but it’s not necessary. Another doctor / dentist / bank manager telephone sentence tomorrow. Bye! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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