Learn English – Podcast: Last orders, please!

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Today’s sentence Hello again… here’s the latest in the series on “strange” things you’ll hear in England. Last orders, please! Notes Last orders please! You will hear this in any pub in Britain. Depending on what time the pub closes, you will hear this shouted by the barman about twenty minutes before that time. So, if the pub closes at 11.00, you’ll hear last orders, please! at about 10.40. It means: “The pub is going to close soon. This is your last chance to buy another drink!” The barman often rings a very noisy bell at the same time. It’s last orders because when you go to the bar and ask for a drink you are ordering a drink. And that’s all for today. We’ll look at another oddity tomorrow. Bye! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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Learn English – Podcast: Hello. Could you send the police round to 99 George Street, please? There’s been a break-in.

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Today’s sentence Hello again. OK, it’s the police we’re calling today… Hello. Could you send the police round to 99 George Street, please? There’s been a break-in. Notes Could you send…? You could, of course, say, “Help! Help! Police! Police! 99 George Street!” But I wouldn’t. This way of saying it is much better. Round . We say this all the time. “Why don’t you come round tonight?” = “why don’t you come to my house tonight.” “Buy a loaf of bread and take it round to your grandmother” = to your grandmother’s house. “Send the police round to …” round is almost meaningless. You can just say “send the police to… OR you could say: “send the police over to 99.George Street…” It means the same thing. There’s been a break-in. Someone has broken a window or door and come into the house. Another word for a break-in is a burglary. Both mean when someone comes into your house and steals things. Don’t’ forget: the number for emergency services in Britain is 999. Anyway, tomorrow’s sentence is a little less dramatic. See you then! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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Learn English – Podcast: Hello, could you put me through to customer services, please?

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Today’s sentence Hello. How are you today? Today, we’re going to look at a different kind of phone call. Hello, could you put me through to customer services, please? Notes You’ve lost your credit card. Your internet connection doesn’t work properly. You bought a sweater from a catalogue and it hasn’t arrived. What do you do? You call “customer services” – the people who deal with customers’ problems. When you call, first you get an operator. You want the customer services department. Could you… = polite way of making requests …put me through to… = connect me with Substitute other departments for customer services – e.g. human resources / the marketing department etc. Or, substitute a name: “Could you put me through to Jim Smith, please?” What do you say next? Find out tomorrow! Bye for now. Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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Learn English – Podcast: I’d like to make an appointment to see Dr. Jones, please.

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Today’s sentence Hi. Here’s the new sentence in the phone-call series. I’d like to make an appointment to see Dr. Jones, please. Notes You’re making an appointment to see the doctor. You could also say, for example, “I’d like to make an appointment to see the bank manager, please.” An appointment is when two people agree to meet each other at a certain time – in a business or formal situation. I’d like to… = a polite way of saying “I want to…” Make an appointment = arrange a meeting with someone. Tomorrow we’ll hear what the secretary’s reply is. See you then! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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