Learn English – Podcast: It’s next to the cinema, opposite the petrol station. You can’t miss it.

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Today’s sentence Hello, how’s it going? Here’s the next in the series on directions. It’s next to the cinema, opposite the petrol station. You can’t miss it. Notes It’s next to the cinema. It’s the building next door to the cinema. Opposite the petrol station. On the other side of the street to the petrol station. You can’t miss it = it is very easy to see; when you are there, you will see it. This is a very common expression in giving directions. OK. That was the last in the series on giving directions. We’re going to start a new topic tomorrow – telephone calls. Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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Learn English – Podcast: Maybe it’s not like that.

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Today’s sentence Greetings! Here’s today’s sentence in the series on expressing doubts. Maybe it’s not like that. Notes Again, here’s an expression which says that you are not totally convinced by an argument / sure that something is true. E.g. Someone says the following: “I think that Jim stole the thousand pounds because he was found with £1000 in his pocket and we know that he owes a lot of money to the bank.” And you say: “Maybe it’s not like that: maybe he won £1000 gambling on horses…” It’s very much like yesterday’s “we don’t know that for sure and certain.” And that, as they say, is that. More tomorrow…see you! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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Learn English – Podcast: It’s half three.

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Today’s sentence Hello again. How’s it going? Here’s another common time expression. It’s half three. Notes This is very common in Britain and Ireland. It’s not common in the United states. In fact, people don’t know what you are talking about if you say this. However, on the European side of the Atlantic it means “half past three.” It’s very common and very informal. In fact, if someone asks you, “have you got the time?” you might just answer, “half three,’ and not bother with “it’s.” That’s all for today. We’ll continue with this theme tomorrow. See you then! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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Learn English – Podcast: It’s ten past.

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Today’s sentence Hi. Welcome back. Here’s today’s sentence. It’s ten past. Notes Right: this is a bit like yesterday’s expression half three. It’s ten past is a colloquial, short way of saying, “it’s ten past (three / four / seven etc.).” Obviously, you only say this if you think the other person knows which hour of the day it is. If you don’t know, you just ask, “ten past what?” OK, we’ll look at another one tomorrow. See you! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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Learn English – Podcast: It’s going. It’s going great!

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Today’s sentence Hi! How’s it going? Here are some possible answers! It’s going. It’s going great! Notes How’s it going? The normal answers, of course, would be “fine / never better etc.” If someone asks you “How’s it going?”, then a literal answer would be “it’s going well,” for example. If you just say, “it’s going,” however, it means that things are not going well: things are just more or less OK. It’s a kind of joke. If things really are going well, then you can use the second answer, “it’s going great.” We’ll continue with this theme tomorrow – don’t go away! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

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Learn English – Podcast: It’s quite a lot of money.

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Today’s sentence Hello again. How are things? Here’s the latest in the series on the uses of quite. It’s quite a lot of money. Notes OK. You want to buy a new car and you see one for £20,000 that you like. Sentence 1: “OK, It’s £20,000, but it’s really good quality and it’ll last for years.” Sentence 2: “£20,000? Wow. That’s very expensive. I’m not sure I can afford that.” Does that make sense? I hope so! Listen to the sentences again… OK, I hope you found that useful. We’ll look at the last sentence in this series tomorrow. See you then! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2009 Less

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