Learn English – Podcast: Would you peel an onion for me?

[odeo=23039218]

Today’s sentence Hi – here’s the latest in the series on cooking. Would you peel an onion for me? Notes To peel something. This means to remove the skin from a vegetable or fruit. Things you can peel: onions, potatoes, oranges, carrots etc. Peel is both a verb and a noun. After you peel an orange, you are left with orange peel. Orange peel is the skin of the orange. That’s all for now – we’ll continue with this tomorrow. Bye for now! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

Learn English for free with podcasts.
Linguagum – Learn English faster!

Copyright: All rights reserved by creator

Learn English – Podcast: Could you just hold on for a second?

[odeo=23169513]

Today’s sentence Hello – how are you today? Here’s another sentence in the series on common time expressions. Could you just hold on for a second? Notes Well, here’s another way of saying, “please wait. I’m busy.” Hold on means the same as hang on. Both mean wait. It’s quite informal, but it’s also polite. Using the form could…? makes it a polite request. Sometimes, if you are on the telephone and the operator asks you to wait, you will hear “will / would / could you hold for a second / a moment?” For some reason we use hold with telephones, not hold on. It means the same thing, though. Hope that was useful. We’ll look at the last expression in this series tomorrow. Bye for now! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

Learn English for free with podcasts.
Linguagum – Learn English faster!

Copyright: All rights reserved by creator

Learn English – Podcast: We don’t know that for sure and certain.

[odeo=23191628]

Today’s sentence Hello! How are things? Here’s the latest in the series on expressing doubts. We don’t know that for sure and certain. Notes Imagine the scene: there’s been a robbery and £1000 has been stolen. Someone is found with £1000 in his pocket. He’s a suspect. However, we don’t know for sure and certain that he stole the money. It’s still only a possibility. Sure means exactly the same as certain. Why do we use both words in the same expression? For greater emphasis. We could also say, “we don’t know that for sure,” or, “we don’t know that for certain.” OK, that’s all for today. We’ll take a look at another expression for expressing doubts tomorrow. See you! Search Linguagum for more English tips, check out our very useful links and our shop! And please, tell us what you think of us! Text and audio © linguagum.com 2006-2008 Less

Learn English for free with podcasts.
Linguagum – Learn English faster!

Copyright: All rights reserved by creator