English use of There is and there are

Form
There is
There isn’t
Is there?
There are
There aren’t
Are there?

Meaning

We use there is and there are when we want to say that something exists (or does not exist):
There’s a centipede under this stone.
There are two good reasons to do this.
There isn’t any flour in the pantry.
There aren’t any seats available.
Is there any petrol in the car?
Are there any potatoes?

Note that we often use there is and there are with a/an, some and any. A/an go with singular, countable nouns. Some and any go with uncountable and plural nouns. (See more about countable and uncountable nouns). A/an and some are used in the affirmative. Any is used with questions and negative statements:
There is a book on the table.
There is an ant on your leg.
There is some tea in the pot.
There are some tools in the second drawer.
There isn’t any water in the bottle.
There aren’t any eggs in the fridge.
Is there any coffee left?
Are there any tickets for the show?

Note that in informal speech, we often use there is with plural nouns:
There’s some people coming in the front gate.
There’s some biscuits in the tin in the pantry.

We can use there in this way with all tenses:
There was a small boy standing next to the pond.
There have been many attempts to climb the mountain.
There will be many refugees if the war begins.

We cannot use it is in the same way as there is. Whereas there is is used to say that something exists, it is is used for things that people already know about, or that we have already talked about.
There’s a big dog in the garden. It’s a German shepherd.

There is and there are (and their forms in other tenses) can also be used in question tags:
There isn’t any reason for going, is there?
There won’t be too many people, will there?
There was nobody looking, was there?

English use of Reflexive pronouns

“When is the word myself used?”

The word myself is known as a reflexive pronoun. Firstly, when should we not use the word?

Myself should not be used as a substitute for the personal object pronoun me. This is a common mistake, as in the following example:
They gave presents to my brother and myself.

The correct form is:
They gave presents to my brother and me.

So, when should you use the word? The golden rule is that you should only use myself if the word I comes before it in the same sentence. When this is the case, the word is used in the following situations:

Firstly, when the subject and object of the sentence are the same:
I know myself.
I saw myself in the mirror.

Secondly, when you want to emphasise, or call more attention to the subject of the sentence:
I did the job myself. (Nobody helped me).
I ate all the cake myself. (Nobody else ate any).

The use of the other reflexive pronouns yourself, himself, herself, ourselves, yourselves and themselves in relation to their subject and object pronouns is the same.

English use of Pronouns

“When is the word myself used?”

The word myself is known as a reflexive pronoun. Firstly, when should we not use the word?

Myself should not be used as a substitute for the personal object pronoun me. This is a common mistake, as in the following example:
They gave presents to my brother and myself.

The correct form is:
They gave presents to my brother and me.

So, when should you use the word? The golden rule is that you should only use myself if the word I comes before it in the same sentence. When this is the case, the word is used in the following situations:

Firstly, when the subject and object of the sentence are the same:
I know myself.
I saw myself in the mirror.

Secondly, when you want to emphasise, or call more attention to the subject of the sentence:
I did the job myself. (Nobody helped me).
I ate all the cake myself. (Nobody else ate any).

The use of the other reflexive pronouns yourself, himself, herself, ourselves, yourselves and themselves in relation to their subject and object pronouns is the same.